How to Pick Your Paint

Painting a room is an exciting prospect that can change the entire look of the space. But knowing where to start can be daunting when you’re staring at row after row of paint cans or color chips. This guide will walk you through the process to creating a pro paint job.

Eclectic Dining Room with High ceiling & Hardwood floors in Fountain Hills, AZ
Eclectic Dining Room with High ceiling & Hardwood floors in Fountain Hills, AZ

 

Project Scope

The first thing you’ll want to plan is the project scope. It can be easy for project scope to “creep” once you’re in the store looking at all of the fabulous color choices. Suddenly you’ve planned to repaint every room in the house, regardless of time or cost constraints. Be sure to plan out exactly which projects you’re aiming to complete so you don’t get off track.

Living Room with Hardwood floors & Wainscoting in Santa Barbara, CA
Living Room with Hardwood floors & Wainscoting in Santa Barbara, CA

How to Pick a Color?

This is probably the most fun part of painting, but also one of the most trying. Choosing the exact right color is time-consuming, and requires effort and thought. Here are some tips to choose a color you’ll love for years.

Start with Chips: Start with paint chips to get a sense of the colors you’re looking for. Bring them home and tape them on the wall or stick them behind trim, and live with them for a few days. Your eye will generally start to gravitate toward one color range. Chips are also useful for comparing with furniture upholstery, draperies and the like to make sure they all coordinate.

Move on to Samples: Once you’ve decided on a color family, choose three to five shades you want to test on the wall, and order samples. Be sure you prime the wall if you’re going to be painting over another color. Again, living with these samples on the wall for a few days is a great way to see which one keeps your attention.

Check with Lighting: It’s important to check samples during the day and with different lights. This makes such a huge difference in the tone of the color, which you may love at dusk but decide feels garish at 7 a.m.. Don’t forget to consider effects of your internal lighting (all floor lamps, overhead lighting, etc.) when you have samples on the wall as well.

Eclectic Living Room by Chris Barrett
Eclectic Living Room by Chris Barrett

Paint Type: Latex vs. Oil

Latex paint is water-based, making clean-up much easier. Since it is water-based, it can go right down a standard drain with soap and water. It dries faster and doesn’t yellow over time, making it ideal for most projects. Chances are, for most applications you’ll want to choose latex paint.

Oil-based paint is thicker and smoother, but requires more drying time and special precautionary and clean-up measures. You’ll want to wear a mask while you work, and the paint and solvents used to clean it are considered hazardous waste by many communities and can’t be thrown away directly.

Eclectic Home Office with Built-in bookshelf & Carpet in New Canaan, CT
Eclectic Home Office with Built-in bookshelf & Carpet in New Canaan, CT

Different Types of Finish

Finish might not be on your radar, but it should. Certain rooms and areas will benefit from different finishes of paint, so you’ll want to be sure you’re getting the best one for your application. Here’s a quick rundown of the options that are available and how to utilize them.

Flat: Flat paint is matte and has no sheen. This makes it easy to hide flaws since it isn’t drawing light to any trouble spots. The downside is cleaning: matte paint is not wipe-able so it’s not great for high-traffic areas. This is generally a specialty paint that works well in less-used spaces.

Satin/Eggshell: The standard for most areas. It’s easy to clean, not too shiny, and lasts well.

Semi-gloss: Semi-gloss has a moderately shiny finish that is neither matte nor eye-catchingly glossy. This makes it even easier to wipe clean with a simple cloth, and gives it a beautiful finish. Trim and woodwork benefit from a semi-gloss that stands out from the satin wall.

High-gloss: The name says it all: this is a very high-shine paint. Since it attracts the eye and light, it is best used for highlighting trim or in areas that see a lot of moisture and can benefit from the durability and easy cleaning of high-gloss paint. It is the smoothest, but also shiniest, of the bunch.

Paint Costs

Paint is expensive, there’s no getting around it. Shelling out for high-quality paint is a worthy investment, though, because the walls are something you live with daily, and flaws will distract your eye.

When shopping, have some basic numbers on hand: know your square footage, the price of the paint, and how much square footage a gallon of that type covers. Keep in mind that less expensive paint may require two coats, and a more expensive all-in-one paint may let you skip a primer. Don’t forget to factor in ceilings, doors and trim.

Thanks to our source,  How to Choose Paint for Your House,  Zillow Digs 

Join our communities on Facebook  and let’s continue the conversation. We’d love to hear what you have to say!

This blog does not provide medical advice. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

Organizing Your Holiday Guest Room for Visiting Relatives

holiday bedroom renovations

This is the time of year we all love. The holidays are finally here and your home is about to play host to friends and relatives – so let’s make sure your guest bedroom is ready. After all, if your guests can’t find a place to settle in with their belongings, they certainly won’t feel relaxed in your home. Here are some helpful ways to prepare your guest room for the busy season ahead.

Organize your holiday guest bedroom this season

 

1.    De-clutter and remove your personal belongings
Even though your guest bedroom may have turned into a “storage room” of boxes, furniture and other household items it’s time to make the room a bedroom again. Start by removing personal belongings such as excessive photographs, trophies, memorabilia and family clutter. While these items may make you feel at home, your guests should feel like they’re staying at a hotel. Personal decorative items that carry out the theme of the room is fine, but remove personal items so out-of-town guests don’t feel like they are intruding by staying at your home.

 

Organized guest room closet

2.    Organize the guest room closets
When your holiday guests arrive they should be able to unpack their suitcases and hang clothing in the closets with minimal effort. We often forget about the closets and take all of our decluttering efforts and shove it into the closet. Think of your guest bedroom as a vacation retreat for your guests where they can find extra bedding for the bed, plenty of hangers for their clothes, and a few personal touches like slippers or a cozy robe would be a welcoming surprise too. Organize your closets to provide ample room for their luggage to fit inside as well as plenty of space to hang winter coats if needed. If space is a premium in your home, try to move your belongings to the top shelves and leave the lower shelves and closet floor for your guests.

3.    Create relaxing sitting areas

holiday bedroom renovation

Organizing a guest bedroom also involves creating seating and relaxation areas of the room. Declutter bookshelves and side tables beside the bed to ensure your guests can relax with their own good book or tablet. Provide an area for guests to plug in electronics if possible. In our “smart electronic” driven world, laptops, tablets and phones beside the bed or desk will help your guests still feel connected while traveling. If you have a reading chair and floor lamp consider creating a reading nook with a book collection and magazines for them to peruse while relaxing before settling down to sleep.

This holiday season let’s get organized! The guest room is the perfect retreat when it’s welcoming and ready for guests. Use these helpful tips to declutter, depersonalize, and to bring the modern comforts of home to your holiday guest bedroom. Your guests will appreciate your hospitality to make their visit memorable.

For more guest bedroom ideas follow the Restonic Pinterest board.

Eager for more sleep info you can really use? Join our communities on Facebook  and let’s continue the conversation. We’d love to hear what you have to say!

This blog does not provide medical advice. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on Restonic.com. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

 

Salute to All Veterans

We would like to take a few moments to thank all Veterans, Reserves and Guardsman and their families. We truly appreciate your sacrifices. Without the commitment made by these men and woman, we would not enjoy all that embodies being an American. Choosing Military Life, whether as a career or for a 2 year stint, is certainly not roses and sunshine. History has also shown us, it has often not been a popular choice. But whether your views are politically for or against the “conflict of the day”, all should agree that those who chose to be members of these organizations who defend This Great Nation deserve, at the very least, our gratitude. Interestingly enough, though our military accounts for less than 1% of our population, we can all claim relations or friends who have been, or are currently in, the service of Our Country. In honor of all Veterans, Reserves and Guardsman and their families, we invite everyone to post a picture and/or snippet about that someone in your life.

 Here is ours: Daniel JC Murphy 1922 to 2010

 

Our father served in the Navy as a radio man, an ETC1-1C, assigned to the 3rd Marine Division, during WWII (December 1942 to August 1946) and again during the Korean War (April 1950 to March 1953). During WWII, he was stationed on the USS Hamul. He was assigned to the Marines, and was among the first waves that landed on the beaches in landing crafts, in The Invasion of Saipan (7/21/44) and Iwo Jima (2/19/45) as well as Okinawa (4/1/45). He acted as a spotter and radioed back co-ordinates to the ships, for bombardments. As WWII ended he was stationed in Tokyo, setting up MacArthur’s communications center, to correspond with America.

He reenlisted during the Korean War, stationed on the JW Thompson and again was assigned to the Marines, landing in North Korea via helicopters.

Our father never spoke of his years in service. It was not until after his passing that we truly understood the breadth of what he had to endure. It is with this knowledge that we recognize and honor all Veterans, Reserves and Guardsman, Every Day of the Week, in our own Families Business. We proudly display his medals, so that none will forget the price all serviceman pay, daily, for our precious freedoms.

Also, much deserving mention, are our Grandfather Daniel Murphy, who fought to defend our freedom in WWI, 2 brothers who served in the Navy during peacetime, brother in law, who was career Air Force, 2 Uncles on our mothers side, who served in the Navy during WWII, and 2 Uncles on our Fathers side, who Served during Korea. We pray all share with our children the sacrifices of the past, so they will understand, there is no entitlement to Freedom. A great way to protect it is to value it as Our Forefathers did.

Thank you Veterans, Reserves and Guardsman in All Branches and their families!

 

 

 

There is no need to feel the opportunity to enjoy your awesome outdoor spaces has passed

There is no need to feel the opportunity to enjoy your awesome outdoor spaces has passed, just because Daylight Savings Time is around the corner. Some of my fondest childhood (and Adult) memories are those involving brisk Fall outdoor settings, often around a bonfire or fire pit. We are spoiled, here in the Great Northwest, as we have a mostly temperate climate, with many stretches of relatively enjoyable conditions. I say we celebrate them! Sit on your front stoop in a cozy porch rocker and peruse the latest new release. Do a little neighborhood “people watching” from the comfort of a soothing porch swing.  Pull up a few Adirondacks around the old fire pit and commune in a family pow-wow.  The beauty of this Great Land is we don’t need Faux scenery. Our Terra Firma are scenic vistas by their very nature. A head cleansing, invigorating, revitalizing hit of H2O is just outside your front door. It fit’s every budget, is Low Calorie, Gluten Free and it’s available 24 – 7, 365. In a land obsessed with Reduce, Reuse, Recycle you would think we would put more emphasis on not wasting this Awesome Resource. Spruce up your outdoor space, whether it’s as vast as an acre or as modest as a front stoop, and USE IT!! Feel free to share your own outdoor living inspirations. The Sanity you may Save could be your Neighbor’s ;o)

 

 

What causes dark circles and puffy eyes?

While researching the “who, what and why on earth”, do I have these circles under my eyes, I discovered some really cool information online and want to share it with you:

We’ve all had that oh my god moment: looking in the mirror one morning and seeing dark circles or unsightly puffy eyes. Maybe it’s an everyday occurrence for you (this particular editor was blessed with — luckily, fairly mild — genetic dark circles), but if not, there’s a couple things that can be causing it, things you may be doing that are totally fixable.

First, it’s important to understand that the skin around your eyes is the thinnest skin on your entire body, and as such is the most sensitive to change. From the flow of fluids to the tugging of regular makeup application, it’s susceptible to a lot more damage than the rest of your body. The two major problems we see with our eyes (other than wrinkles) are puffiness and dark circles. Here’s why.

Puffy Eyes

Puffiness comes from a range of causes: from a cold or sinus infection and seasonal allergies, to eating a salty dinner or watching a tear-jerker before bed. In truth, it’s all about osmosis: water will move from areas with a low concentration of salt to areas with a high concentration — in an effort to balance out the levels of sodium. So whether you were crying a lot watching “The Notebook” last night or ate an entire bag of salty pretzels, your body is going to over-compensate.

Another cause of puffy eyes could come from the way you sleep. Sleeping on your side or your stomach may cause fluids to pool in your eyes (if this is the case, sleeping on your right will result in more puffiness in that eye). It’s not easy to change, but if this is your problem, try sleeping on your back!

Some more causes of puffiness are rubbing your eyes a lot or falling asleep with makeup on. Not only are these proponents of wrinkles and breakouts, but they risk irritating your eyes too. Cutting down on these behaviors will reduce this unsightly issue. If you have fluid retention thanks to a salty meal, try snacking on bananas or raisins, which will alleviate the problem. If tears are your issue, try applying a cool compress under your eyes, or cooled-down tea bags.

Dark Circles

Dark circles are often associated with tiredness, but they can be caused by a lot more than a lack of sleep. Unfortunately, some of us are born with them! Genetics always play a role, and pigmentary issues that cause under-eye discoloration is common among people of Asian and African descent. The other unavoidable cause of dark circles is simply age — our skin thins as we age, and as this particular skin is already thin, this effect will increase the visibility of the tiny blood vessels in the area. With age, while you lose volume in the area under your eyes, it also exposes the orbital bone — creating a hollow “trough” that looks like a dark circle.

So ask yourself this question: do you have blue under-eye circles, or brown? Brown circles are often the first of the two causes: genetics. But it can also be because of hyperpigmentation caused by rubbing your eyes a lot or excessive exposure to the sun. Try using a cream containing soy or citrus that will gradually brighten the skin over six weeks, and do your best to stop rubbing your eyes. As always, sunscreen is key for your safety — and for maintaining glowing skin!

If your circles are blueish, it’s because of pooling blood in the area under your eyes, and will likely be most visible in the mornings. When you’re sleeping, fluids will accumulate and your veins will expand to hold more blood. A lack of sleep often gives you dark circles, because you’ll look paler and thus more hollow-eyed. Aging is often a factor in this type of dark circle, because as mentioned above, thinning skin will expose the blood vessels more.

There are a couple quick fixes for dark circles, the most immediate weapon in your arsenal being makeup. Choose a concealer that matches your skin tone (you may have been told to go a few shades lighter, but this is never a good look!). If you have mild circles go for a liquid formula, darker discoloration will need a heavier cream or cake concealer. If your skin is thin, you can try using creams with caffeine in them, which will constrict the blood vessels and temporarily boost circulation. You can fight the good fight on a daily basis by applying night cream. Products with hyaluronic acid will plump the area, hydrating the skin and pushing it up and away from the blood, whereas those containing retinoic acid will thicken the skin to conceal the darkness. As always, when applying concealer or cream to your eyes, PAT, do not drag, the product from the corner of your eyes to just past the edge.

 

Thanks to our source AOL.COM

http://www.aol.com/article/2015/05/13/dark-circles-and-puffy-eyes-what-causes-them-and-what-you-can/20640044/

Nightmares, Insomnia & Depression – Oh My!

How the three are intertwined

Sleep plays an important role in a person’s health and mood regulation. When a person suffers from nightmares, it not only affects their sleeping life but their waking life as well. According to Mayo Clinic, a nightmare is a disturbing dream associated with negative feelings, such as anxiety or fear. Nightmares can cause anxiety about returning to sleep, which can spiral into a debilitating cycle. Nightmares can cause a lack of sleep, which in turn can cause a variety of issues including insomnia and depression. The same is also true reverse – insomnia and depression can cause nightmares. The three are often intertwined.

Nightmares and depression

During the 1970s, psychologists noted that people suffering from depression also reported more dreams than average. In fact, people who are clinically depressed may dream three or four times as much. The quality of REM sleep dreams is different too – more intense emotions, more negative themes, more nightmares, and more unpleasant dreams. In general. REM sleep is the time when your brain is most active during sleep, which is when your brain actively works to heal and replenish itself. These unpleasant dreams are often mixed with insomnia, leaving someone tired. Read more at DreamStudies.org

Nightmares & insomnia and their effect on depression

Researchers at Tokyo Medical University in Japan investigated the influence of nightmares on depression, both independently and in conjunction with insomnia. They found nightmares can aggravate the symptoms of depression. They also learned that the joint presence of insomnia with nightmares had a significant effect on the severity of depression. Read more at PsychologyToday.com

 

As researchers work toward better understanding the links between insomnia and depression, it’s clear that a deeper understanding of sleep and its effect on mood regulation and mood disorder is needed as well.

 

If you suffer from insomnia and/or nightmares, there is no one simple solution – as you well know. But there are changes you can make. Try these tips to help you sleep better and wake up better rested:

·       Set an alarm for bed – Set an alarm as a reminder to start your nightly routine to help your body prepare for sleep. Going to bed at the same time each night trains your brain and body when to anticipate sleep, which will help you relax.

·       No nightcaps – Alcohol and sleep do not mix well. If you’re already having a hard time sleeping, a nightcap won’t help as alcohol can effect a person’s REM sleep cycle.

·       Stretch it out – Yoga is a great way to unwind and decompress at the end of the day. There are several simple positions you can do to help you relax before bed.

·       Caffeine – Just say no to that afternoon cup of coffee. It can feel like a great pick-me-up when that sluggish afternoon feeling hits, but that buzz lasts longer than you think and makes it harder for you to fall asleep.

·       Don’t lie in bed – If you can’t sleep, do something. Read a book. Write in a journal. Make a to-do list for the next day. Listen to soothing music.

 

If you are suffering from chronic nightmares or insomnia or symptoms of depression, know that you are not alone and a doctor can help. If you’re ready to find a sleep doctor, check out this list of sleep specialists for help in your area.

 

Eager for more sleep info you can really use? Join our communities on Facebook and let’s continue the conversation. We’d love to hear what you have to say!

 

This blog was originally published on Restonic.com and does not provide medical advice. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on Restonic.com. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

Children & Sleep Deprivation Risks

Kids, Obesity & Sleep Deprivation
Our tired kids growing into fat adults
Children who don’t sleep enough in the first years of life face a higher risk of obesity as they age. A study released from MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) in Massachusetts found that sleep deprivation at ANY point during infancy and early childhood can have a dramatic impact on body fat by the time a child reaches 7 years old.

That’s not good news…
Long term effects of sleepy kids
“Contrary to some published studies, we did not find a particular ‘critical period’ for the influence of sleep duration on weight gain. Instead, insufficient sleep at any time in early childhood had adverse effects,” said Elsie Taveras, MD, MPH, chief of General Pediatrics at MGHfC and lead author of the Pediatrics paper in a press release.

The study found that children who slept less than 12 hours per day between 6 months and 2 years old, less than 10 hours between 3 and 4 years old and less than 9 hours between 5 and 7 years old were a high obesity risk. And as those children grow up, their poor sleeping habits and weight gain continues.

Compared to 20 years ago, there are twice as many overweight kids between the ages of 6 and 11 in the United States today. What’s more, the number of obese teens has more than tripled. The bad news is that childhood obesity has reached epidemic status. The good news is that the solution is within our grasp – and it starts with healthy sleep habits for the whole family.
Lifelong sleep habits start early
As parents, you’re the biggest influencer of your child’s sleep habits, which begin in infancy and last a lifetime. As your baby reaches toddlerhood, enforcing a regular sleep schedule prepares him or her for the routine of school, but there’s so much more you can do. Here are a few suggestions that will help your child sleep better. For life!

Exercise (with your kids) every day – Sleep is the fuel in our gas tanks. It gives us the get-up-and-go to physically move our bodies during the day. When we don’t use that fuel, sleep is elusive – for kids and adults alike. So get outside every day, move that body and get happy – it’s good for your sleeper!

Nix sugar and caffeine – Sweetened juices and sodas are bad for all of us – but they’re even more dangerous for a child’s immature metabolism. Try some warm milk before bed. According to WebMD, your mom was right after all.

Limit screen time – Just like a rooster crows at first light, the light from an iPad, laptop or TV sends a signal to your child’s brain that it’s time to wake up and get busy. Power down all electronic devices two hours before bedtime.

Follow a routine – You need to relax before sleep. So does your child. Doing things in the same order each night (brush teeth, put pajamas on, read together, cuddle for a while) will help your child begin to understand how to relax before bed.

Anticipate (and avoid) conflicts – If you know your child is going to plead for one more drink, one more story, one more whatever, make those requests part of your routine. Rather than negotiating, give into the “one more” and then make it clear that one is the limit – always the limit. Your child will feel like s/he’s winning and you’ll make the settling down smoother.

Create a cocoon – We all sleep better in cool, dark, quiet environments. Create a welcoming, soothing bedroom for your child that sends a strong sleep signal. We also think a supportive mattress supports your dreams for a healthier, happier life. If you’re not sure how support, conformability or firmness can contribute to your child’s good night’s sleep, we can help: best mattress for a healthy back.

As with anything health related, if you’re concerned about your child’s sleep habits or sleep health, always consult your doctor.

Eager for more sleep info you can really use? Join our communities on Facebook and Twitter and let’s continue the conversation. We’d love to hear what you have to say!

This blog was originally published on Restonic.com and does not provide medical advice. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on Restonic.com. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

Mattress

cant sleep

How Much Sleep Do You Really Need?Are you getting enough sleep to thrive – or just survive?Struggling to get a good night’s sleep? You’re not alone. Many sleep experts feel that sleep deprivation may be the next public health epidemic. Sadly, unlike a flu virus, there’s no one answer to the problem – our reasons for not getting the sleep we need are as diverse as how it affects us.Lack of sleep has been linked to car crashes (more than 10,000 per year), industrial disasters (Exxon Valdez & Stanton Island Ferry) and a staggering amount of preventable occupational errors. What’s more. people who suffer from sleep deprivation are also more likely to suffer from chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, depression and obesity, as well as from cancer, early death and reduced quality of life and productivity.I just want to sleep… If sleep is elusive, take back the night by looking closely at your sleep habits and everything in your life that may affect your sleep (or lack of it!). Let’s start with your bedroom:

 

·       Mind an electronic curfew – Designate your room an electronic-free zone and power down an hour before bedtime. If you must sleep with your phone beside you, place it facedown for the night and filter incoming calls.

 

·       Reduce lighting – Use a nightlight or dimmer switch so a trip to the bathroom in the middle of the night doesn’t require you to turn on lights (which sends a signal to your brain that it’s time to wake up).

 

·       Inspect your bedding and mattress – Like needing the right shoes to run a marathon, you need great bedding to get you to the finish line of the morning. If your mattress is more than 7 years old, do the touch test and inspect it closely for sagging and/or protruding springs. What you sleep on is directly related to how well you sleep.

 

·       Shield your senses – Blackout shades, eye patches and earplugs can help reduce sleep theft. Streetlights, television in the next room or a snoring partner all contribute to robbing you of the sleep you need for the next day.

 

·       Commit to sleep – Getting a good night’s sleep begins with a bedtime routine that you follow regularly. Try setting an alarm to go to bed as well as one to wake up to keep you on track.

 

If you’re struggling to get a good night’s sleep, check out what our research turned up this week. Hopefully these resources will help you get the sleep you need and enjoy your mornings a whole lot more.

How much sleep do you really need?

Studies show that people who sleep between 6.5 hr. and 7.5 hr. a night, as they report, live the longest. And people who sleep 8 hr. or more, or less than 6.5 hr., they don’t live quite as long. There is just as much risk associated with sleeping too long as with sleeping too short. The big surprise is that long sleep seems to start at 8 hr. Sleeping 8.5 hr. might really be a little worse than sleeping 5 hr. Read more on Time.com.

Are separate bedrooms the new black?

According to The National Sleep Foundation, today a growing number of American couples actually sleep in separate bedrooms. Studies in England and Japan reveal a similar trend. For the 25 percent of couples who choose to sleep apart, reasons include snoring, disrupted sleep, temperature preferences, different schedules or sleep habits. Read more on the HuffingtonPost.com.

Do you have a sleep disorder and not even know it?

The term sleep disorder may suggest someone tossing and turning all night, but lying awake for hours with insomnia is just one example of many conditions that affect how you sleep and function during the day. In fact, you can have a sleep disorder and not even know it. Read more on Health.com.

If you’re ready for a new mattress, we’d love to help you find the right one for you. Visit Murphy’s Furniture where you can lie on our mattresses and talk to a trained sales professional.

Join our communities on Facebook and let’s continue the conversation. We’d love to hear what you have to say!

 

This blog was originally published on Restonic.com and does not provide medical advice. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on Restonic.com. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

Mattress shopping tips

shopping for a mattress

Top 3 Tips for Buying a New MattressFinding the best mattress for a good night’s sleepSleep deprived? Wake up because your sleep thief may be lurking under your covers – your mattress. You spend a lot of time in bed and how well and how long you sleep affects everything in your life. The trouble is, most of us don’t equate our sleep health with our overall health and when we do connect the dots, buying a new mattress is a big, expensive deal – and it’s not something you can afford to make a mistake on.For most people, comfort is the decision maker but support, durability and health issues are equally important.

 

It’s time to go mattress shopping if you answer yes to any of the following questions:

·       You wake up with achy muscles a few times a week

·       You sleep better away from home

·       Your mattress’ best feature is the lumps and/or valleys that cause you to roll into you partner

·       The fabric on your mattress is worn or torn

·       Your mattress 7-10 years old?

 

“Finding the right mattress isn’t about searching out the highest-tech brand or spending the most money,” writes Stephanie Watson on WebMD. “Instead of focusing on price and brand name, think about what you want in a mattress.”

 

If it’s been a while since you bought a new mattress, read through our top 3 tips and learn how to test drive a good night’s sleep before you buy.

Concentrate on comfort

To truly know if a mattress is right for you, lie down on it. One manufacturer’s firm is another’s medium/firm – or extra/firm. Pick a focus point – your shoulder, lower back or your hips – and gauge how the mattress feels at that spot. And then lie on it like you lie on your mattress at home. A side sleeper needs extra cushioning in the hip and shoulder, but a back sleeper may need additional lumbar support. There’s no magic mattress that’s best for everyone, but visiting a mattress retailer will help you feel your way to a better night’s sleep.

 

Hint: If you share your bed with a partner, test mattresses together and discuss what feels good and why.

The difference between supportive & firm

My mother told me the best way to protect my spine was to sleep on a mattress that resembled a butcher’s block. A firm mattress is not necessarily a supportive mattress though. A medium to firm mattresses will likely buffer pressure points better, which allows your muscles to relax and aligns your spine naturally. Your spine is curved naturally and supporting those curves will rejuvenate and revitalize you.

 

Hint: Ask the sales person lots of questions and be honest about pain issues you’re currently experiencing. The more information you provide, the quicker you’ll find the right mattress for you.

Discuss durability expectations

How long do you expect your mattress to support you? Like all products, your mattress will gradually (over time) lose the ability to buffer pressure points and support your spine properly – that’s natural wear and tear. The Better Sleep Council recommends buying a new mattress every 5-7 years and offers a handy mattress shopping tip sheet.

 

Remember, a mattress warranty protects against defects in workmanship and materials, which age a mattress faster and must be addressed by the store that sold you the mattress. If you’re not a warranty/receipt keeper, it’s time to start.

 

Hint: Read mattress reviews online – but maintain perspective. Some review sites are filled with competitors bashing each other, which isn’t helpful to consumers. Visit their social media sites and ask members of their communities for first-hand advice.

 

If you’re ready for a new mattress, we’d love to help you find the right one for you. Visit Murphy’s Furniture where you can lie on our mattresses and talk to a trained sales professional. Join our communities on Facebook and let’s continue the conversation. We’d love to hear what you have to say!

 

This blog was originally published on Restonic.com and does not provide medical advice. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on Restonic.com. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911

Better Sleep

yoga

Top 10 Yoga Asanas for Health Sleep Prescription-free, happy sleep fixesTroubled by disrupted, erratic sleeping patterns? Restless during the night? Relax, you may not be suffering from full-fledged insomnia. Minor sleep troubles are common and the fix may be easier than you imagine. While sleep-inducing medications are always an option, many have negative effects in the long run. Instead, try some of these easy-to-do yoga poses for healthy sleep with only healthy side effects.

Pigeon pose

Get down on all your fours and place your right knee right behind your right wrist. Angle your right foot towards the left. Stretch your left leg back and place a pillow on the left of your right leg in front of you. Now lay your belly and chest on the pillow and relax your arms on either side. Breathe deeply for a few seconds and switch legs.

Supported inversion

Lie on your back perpendicular to a wall with your feet resting on the wall and your hips as close as possible to the edge of the floor. Slowly stretch your legs along the wall and slide your hips towards the wall until your entire legs are in contact with the wall. Closing your eyes, take deep breaths.

Reclined butterfly

Place a pillow and lie on your back on top of it. Bring together your soles and let your knees gently fall to the side. Stretch your arms away from the body with the palms open and facing the ceiling. Your hips should be off the pillow; support only your spine on it.

Recline big toe hold

Lie on your back and grab your leg (any part that you can comfortably reach – knee, ankle or big toe if you can) and extend it towards the ceiling. Breathing deeply, slowly bring the leg as close as you can.

Reclined spinal twist

Lie on your back and tuck your right knee above your chest and then cross it on the left side of your body. This twisting stretch relaxes the spine. Stretch your arms on either side and hold the position for 3 breaths, and then switch to the left knee in the same way.

Cobra pose

Lie on your stomach and lift your face and chest while resting on your palms. Your elbows should be close to your body, just beside your ribs. Inhale as you rise, lifting as much of your body above the navel as you can.

Seated heart opener

Kneel on the floor and put your palms on the floor behind you, fingers splayed away from your body. Inhale and stretch your spine. Arch your back, lower your head back and lean backwards during exhaling.

Plow pose

This is a more challenging pose. Lie on your back and tightening your abdominal muscles, lift your legs above you. Slowly bring your legs down above you until your toes reach the floor above your head. Clasp your hands under your back. You can also do this without your toes reaching the floor. Both your legs and arms should be straight and not bent at the knee of the elbow.

Crossed leg bend

Sit in the Padmasana pose or the lotus position and gently roll forward on your hips. Reach forward with your hands straight out in front of you on the yoga mat and your head tucked down between the shoulders. Hold this pose for a few deep breaths.

Meditation

A short spell of meditation is great for bringing your mind and body at peace, and ready for sleep. Sit on your bed in a cross legged position, close your eyes and breathe deeply for a few minutes.

 

The next time you toss and turn in bed, take a few minutes off the struggle and try these yoga postures. You will be surprised to see how easily you drift into sleep. Practicing these yoga postures will keep your mind at peace and allow you to slip into deep slumber without much trouble.

 

If you’re ready for a new mattress, we’d love to help you find the right one for you. Visit Murphy’s Furniture where you can lie on our mattresses and talk to a trained sales professional.

Eager for more sleep info you can really use? Join our communities on Facebook  and let’s continue the conversation. We’d love to hear what you have to say!

 

This blog was originally published on Restonic.com and does not provide medical advice. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on Restonic.com. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.